Expository Essay Samples For Students

The Rise of Teenage Gangs and Negative Consequences They Have

Teenagers constantly look for the place they belong. Isn’t it everyone’s dream to belong to a certain group of people, to find like-minded individuals and feel accepted? Unfortunately, a vast majority of teenagers take a wrong turn and get lost on their path to acceptance. It is not uncommon for them to join teen gangs feeling like their members understand them, but that is far from the truth. The rise of teenage gangs is a major problem nowadays. But, how serious this problem really is? Consequences of gang membership can scar a person for life in several ways.

Youth, teenage, or juvenile gang is defined as an organized group of adolescents and/or young adults who rely on group intimidation and violence to commit criminal acts with the purpose to gain power, recognition, and control. The rise of teenage gangs is perfectly explained in a study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health wherein researchers discovered there were 1,059,000 youth gang members in the United States in 2010. Moreover, on a yearly basis 401,000 juveniles join gangs. The primary reason why this staggering number of gang members goes unnoticed is due to the fact that they may not conform to popular perceptions of teen gang demographics.

Another potential reason why the total number of gangs and gang members keeps increasing is because a great majority of crimes they commit usually goes unreported. As a result, government officials find it difficult to gather exact data about this growing issue. Youth gang members primarily focus on their peers, bully them, and force them to say nothing in order to avoid harsher consequences.

When discussing the issue of youth crime groups, one must wonder how one decides to join them. Risk factors that enhance a teenager’s odds of joining a gang include drug or alcohol abuse, negative influences, peer pressure, a strong desire for recognition and belonging, lack of parental supervision, and limited attachment to the community. Most adults do not take this problem seriously enough and, usually, consider it as just another phase teenagers go through. However, the American Journal of Public Health published a research showing that gang membership in the adolescence has severe consequences in adulthood, long after a person leaves the gang. Besides higher likelihood of criminal activities, people who were gang members in the adolescence also experienced financial issues and were in poor health in adulthood.

While most teenagers have a strong urge to feel accepted by their peers, others seek the solace and comfort or escape from their difficult family life in gangs. Although the current data shows the staggering number of gang members it is assumed the problem could be even more severe as most of them do not fit into the gang demographics and many crimes are not reported. Finally, there is a growing need for the entire society to take necessary measures and work on this issue. If not, the consequences could be far more severe.

Gang Membership Between Ages 5 and 17 Years in the United States

Pyrooz, David C. et al.

Journal of Adolescent Health, Volume 56 , Issue 4 , 414 – 419

Long-Term Consequences of Adolescent Gang Membership for Adult Functioning

Amanda B. Gilman, Karl G. Hill, and J. David Hawkins

American Journal of Public Health 2014 104, 5, 938-945

When I started my first job as a professional newspaper reporter (This job also served as an internship during my junior year in college — I just didn’t leave for about 6 years.), I quickly realized that all my experience, and all my years of journalism education had not been enough to help me write stories about drug busts, fatal car accidents and tornadoes. All the theoretical work I’d done, and all of the nifty little scholastic and collegiate stories I had done, did not prepare me for real world writing.

At that point, I had to find a solution quickly. After all, I had a deadline to meet, and it was only a few hours away.

One of my colleagues, who also served as a mentor, had the solution. She introduced me to the newspaper’s “morgue.” This was a room filled with filing cabinets in which we kept old — dead — stories arranged by reporter. Whenever I wasn’t’ sure how to write a story, all I had to do was check the morgue for similar stories. If I needed to write a story about a local drug bust, for example, I’d find another story on a similar incident, study its structure, and mentally create a formula in which to plugin the information I’d gathered.

Once I’d gained more experience, and had internalized the formula for that particular type of story, I felt free to branch out as the situation — and my training — warranted.

I do the same thing when I want to write a type of letter, brochure, or report that I’ve never written before.

This is what writing looks like in the real world.

Research by “Write Like This” author Kelly Gallagher indicates that if we want students to grow as writers, we need to provide them with good writing to read, study, and emulate. My personal experience backs this up, as does the old adage “all writing is rewriting,” oft quoted by everyone from LA screenwriters to New York Times bestselling authors.

Of course, if you’re a new teacher like me, there is one problem with providing mentor texts to my students: I have a dearth of middle school level writing sitting around in my file cabinets.

Fortunately, the Internet is full of sources, so I scoured the bowels of Google to find examples. I know how busy you are, so I’m sharing.

Expository writing examples for middle school

Below are several sources of expository writing samples for middle school students.

Finally, here is an article in the New York Times that will help you teach your students real-world expository writing skills.

Descriptive writing examples for middle school

Narrative writing examples for middle school

Argumentative/persuasive writing examples for middle school

Reflective writing examples for middle school

If you know of any other online writing example sources, please feel free to share them in the comments below.

 

I am a secondary English Language Arts teacher, a University of Oklahoma graduate student, and a NBPTS candidate. I am constantly seeking ways to amplify my students’ voices and choices.

Filed Under: PedagogyTagged With: writing examples, writing samples

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