Homework Charts Printable

How to Use an Advanced Homework Progress Tracker

The homework progress tracker allows you and your child to keep track of several homework related activities. It is important that you help your child with this for the first few weeks to ensure that your child understands ho to use it. You could also involve your child’s teacher with certain portions of this chart. For example, you could ask your child’s teacher to initial the chart when an entire homework assignment has been turned in. This might be more appropriate for some children, particularly those who have a history of being dishonest about school work.

Before you begin, you should decide where you will keep the chart. For this chart, it might be best to slide it into the front outside of a binder with a clear plastic cover, or slide the chart into a clear sheet protector inside the binder. It is important that the chart is in a place that is readily accessible and visible. Kids who have ADHD can benefit if the chart is in a spot where they will easily see it. This will help them remember to use it.

Step 1: Establish The Baseline

To begin, enter your child’s class subjects in the left hand column. For the first week you simply sit with your child and go through the worksheet together each day. Working one subject at a time, have him either check “None” if there is no homework, or have him do his homework before checking the “Done” box. The “Packed” box should be checked after the assignment is put in the child’s folder and/or backpack. Your child is responsible for checking the “Turned In” box when he hands in each assignment the next day. Once his homework is done, enter checkmarks for the appropriate boxes on the lower Task section of the worksheet. You may add other tasks if desired. If something is not complete, simply leave the box blank. It is not recommended to put any negative words or symbols such as “No” or a frowning face.

At the end of the week, count up the number of checkmarks your child earned each day or for the entire week. This is the baseline. Now that you know the baseline, you can set a goal for the following week.

Step 2: Establish a Goal

You can set daily goals, weekly goals, or both. Here are some examples:

Daily goal and reward system: The maximum number of checkmarks your child can earn each day with the chart unmodified is 22. Suppose your child currently gets about 10 check marks each day. It is not reasonable to ask your child to immediately begin getting 22 check marks each day. Rather you want to start where he is and slowly work forward. You might make it a goal for your child to get 15 checkmarks per day next week. Each day your child reaches 15 checkmarks next week, he would earn a reward such as an extra half hour on the computer.

Weekly goal and reward system: You could also offer weekly rewards. You count up the baseline total of checkmarks during the first week- let’s say 50 for the week as an example. For the next week you might set a goal for your child to earn 65 checkmarks. If he gets 65 or more checkmarks next week, this would earn him a larger reward on the weekend such as going to the movies.

Step 3: Continue to Evaluate Progress

As your child achieves each goal, you can slightly increase the goal for the following week. Don’t hesitate to mix up the rewards if your child is getting bored, or offer two choices for your child to choose from.

Are you having a difficult time getting your kids to do homework? Homework time is difficult in most families since most kids do not like to do homework. There are always better things to do – watch TV, play computer games, friends, telephone and many other distractions. Some parents find themselves arguing, begging, bribing and nagging their kids to do their homework.

A homework reward chart might be just what you need to end the homework nightmare!  In many cases, the chart will assist you to make homework time more pleasant and motivate your kids to do homework without even having to ask!

These free printable homework charts can be used not only by parents but by teachers too. If you have students who do not do homework on a regular basis you can suggest to their parents that they use a homework chart (or even print one for them) to help provide them with a useful tool that might encourage your student to do homework.

Printable Homework Chart

Print out this chart and hang it near your child’s desk or somewhere even more accessible like on the fridge.

Homework Completion Chart

Write a list of subjects in the top line and each time your complete your homework in that subject mark the chart.

Weekly Homework Chart

This chart will track your homework for the entire school  week (from Monday to Friday).

 Study Charts

Some children do not like the work “homework”. It makes them resist automatically. Their first reaction is “I have no homework”. Some children find it better to relate to the term “study time”. They prefer “study time” to “homework time”. Studying is something that you have to do whether you have homework or not.

If you find that your child relates better to study time than homework time you might want to change your terminology. The following charts are titled “Study Charts” instead of “Homework Charts” for those who prefer to refer to this time as study time instead of homework time.

These charts are also very suitable for teenagers who need to study and not necessarily only do homework. These charts will help them plan their study time to ensure that they don’t need to cram before exams.

How do you use a homework chart to get your kids to do homework?

A homework chart will very often help to motivate your children to get their homework done but it is important to understand WHY your child is having problems with homework. Sometimes, understanding WHY your child doesn’t want to do his homework will help you use the homework chart in a more efficient manner.

Does he find it boring because he has more interesting things to do? In this case, a homework chart can make homework more interesting. It will enable the child to focus on the incentives that she could receive if she completes the homework chart. For example, once the chart is complete she can get her allowance. Each time she does her homework she gets a sticker for that day. If she gets a sticker every day she will get her full allowance. For each day that she does not do her homework or she does a poor job, she can either choose to redo her homework or to forfeit the sticker for that day. If she forfeits the sticker then she will not get a full allowance.

Does he find homework too difficult because he is behind the class? If this is the case, then he might need a more hands on approach and he might need you to help him catch up with the class.

Is your child too insecure? Does he think that he can’t do the homework without you.

Does he never have the right equipment and keep leaving the books at school if he even remembers what the homework is? If this is the case, you might want to give him a sticker each time that he is organized, writes down what needs to be done and brings home the necessary equipment. For these kids, learning to be more organized is half the battle and will help them in the future.

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